Information, Intelligence, and the Origins of Life

by Randy Isaac
The term “information” has a connotation of knowledge in the midst of ignorance, an order that arises amid disorder. Information exists everywhere around us, and we spend our lives acquiring, storing, transmitting, and processing it. Yet it is hard for us to define or describe it, in part because the word can be used . . . → Read More: Information, Intelligence, and the Origins of Life

The Evolutionary Origins of Genetic Information

by Stephen Freeland
Any living branch of science achieves progress by testing new ideas. The results of these tests determine whether each new idea is accepted as a change to what we thought we knew, is dismissed as incorrect, or simply stagnates, owing to a lack of clear evidence. For evolutionary theory, one such proposition is that . . . → Read More: The Evolutionary Origins of Genetic Information

Biological Information, Molecular Structure, and the Origins Debate

by Jonathan K. Watts
Biomolecules contain tremendous amounts of information; this information is “written” and “read” through their chemical structures and functions. A change in the information of a biomolecule is a change in the physical properties of that molecule—a change in the molecule itself. It is impossible to separate the information contained in biomolecules from their . . . → Read More: Biological Information, Molecular Structure, and the Origins Debate

Chaos and Chaos-Complexity Theory: Understanding Evil Forces with Insights from Contemporary Science and Linguistics

by E. Janet Warren
Since the Bible lacks a cohesive demonology, scholars tend to either maximize or minimize the ontology of evil. I suggest two solutions to reconcile these views: metaphor theory can elucidate the diverse biblical descriptors, and chaos-complexity theory can provide a model for demonology. Metaphors/models can depict reality, are frequently used in science, and . . . → Read More: Chaos and Chaos-Complexity Theory: Understanding Evil Forces with Insights from Contemporary Science and Linguistics

Biological Complexity

by Harry Cook and Hank D. Bestman
Complexity is often defined in the language of mathematics, computers, or information theory. We examine biological complexity as it occurs in the cytoplasm’s relation to nuclear function, and in the case of epigenetics. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the pendulum swings between appreciation of biological holism and complexity, and . . . → Read More: Biological Complexity

Evangelicals, Creation, and Scripture: Legacies from a Long History

by Mark A. Noll
This article specifies fifteen attitudes, assumptions, and convictions from the long history of western interaction between Christianity and science that continue to shape the perceptions of American conservative Protestants to this day. It finds three of them arising in the Middle Ages and early modern period, five from early United States history, five . . . → Read More: Evangelicals, Creation, and Scripture: Legacies from a Long History

Seeking a Signature

by Dennis Venema

Essay Review of SIGNATURE IN THE CELL: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent
Design by Stephen C. Meyer. New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 2009.
viii + 613 pages. Hardcover; $28.99. ISBN: 9780061472787.

Stephen C. Meyer’s recent tome Signature in the Cell (hereafter, Signature) represents the “state of the art” for the intelligent design (ID) movement with respect . . . → Read More: Seeking a Signature

Naturalistic versus Eschatological Theologies of Evolution

by Junghyung Kim

In this article I pose two primary questions. (1) How is God’s action in the evolutionary process to be understood with regard to seemingly self-explanatory evolutionary novelties, novelties with no telos inherent within them? (2) How can Christian affirmation of divine action in evolution be reconciled with the massive yet unavoidable evil and suffering . . . → Read More: Naturalistic versus Eschatological Theologies of Evolution

Biblical Longevities: Empirical Data or Fabricated Numbers?

by Walter Makous

Whether the biblical longevities have biological or cultural significance depends on whether they represent actual longevities or are fabricated. As the properties of fabricated numbers differ from those of natural phenomena, this paper examines these properties, particularly in light of those differences. The results show (1) an exponential decline toward contemporary longevities, following approximate . . . → Read More: Biblical Longevities: Empirical Data or Fabricated Numbers?

Claiming Complementarity: Twentieth-Century Evangelical Applications of an Idea

by Christopher M. Rios

Over the course of the twentieth century the concept of complementarity earned considerable support among evangelical scientists. Leading figures in both the USA and Britain argued that science and theology offered distinct perspectives of the natural world that were reconcilable, if recognized as complementary descriptions rather than mutually exclusive claims. Though not without . . . → Read More: Claiming Complementarity: Twentieth-Century Evangelical Applications of an Idea

 

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