Chaos and Chaos-Complexity Theory: Understanding Evil Forces with Insights from Contemporary Science and Linguistics

by E. Janet Warren
Since the Bible lacks a cohesive demonology, scholars tend to either maximize or minimize the ontology of evil. I suggest two solutions to reconcile these views: metaphor theory can elucidate the diverse biblical descriptors, and chaos-complexity theory can provide a model for demonology. Metaphors/models can depict reality, are frequently used in science, and . . . → Read More: Chaos and Chaos-Complexity Theory: Understanding Evil Forces with Insights from Contemporary Science and Linguistics

Neurotheology: Avoiding a Reinvented Phrenology

by Wayne D. Norman and Malcolm A. Jeeves

Over the past several decades, a number of proposals have been advanced to explain the relationship between human brain functioning and religious experiences and behaviors. In the nineteenth century, phrenologists were also interested in these relationships. A wide variety of positions existed amongst deist and Christian phrenologists and . . . → Read More: Neurotheology: Avoiding a Reinvented Phrenology

Peering into People’s Brains: Neuroscience’s Intrusion into Our Inner Sanctum

by D. Gareth Jones

“Peering into the brain” has a number of connotations: from directly examining aspects of the functioning of an individual’s brain and hence what that individual may be thinking, to investigating the power of neuroscience to provide insights into characteristic features of our humanity. This article picks up on these different connotations and surveys several . . . → Read More: Peering into People’s Brains: Neuroscience’s Intrusion into Our Inner Sanctum

Spirituality Research: Measuring the Immeasurable?

David O. Moberg

The rising popularity of spirituality is accompanied by a flood of research in numerous disciplines to probe its relationships with health, wellness, and countless other topics. Initially subsumed under religion, especially Christianity, and still overlapping with it, spirituality is increasingly treated as a distinct topic that applies to all religions and to persons who . . . → Read More: Spirituality Research: Measuring the Immeasurable?

Biology of Spirituality

by Kevin S. Seybold

The idea that there is a biological basis for human spirituality is controversial to many people. There is, nevertheless, a growing body of empirical evidence coming from neuroscience, psychology, cognitive science, and related disciplines interpreted by some as suggestive of a biological basis for belief in God or the transcendent. The purpose of this . . . → Read More: Biology of Spirituality

Conscious Experience and Science: Signs of Transition

by Thaddeus J. Trenn

Available neurological correlates of personal conscious experience can often be detected, identified, and measured objectively. Substituting neurological correlates uncritically for personal conscious experience per se, if unintended, would constitute the error of reductionism. If intended, such substitution reflects decisions already taken on basic and highly contentious issues concerning the acceptable nature of the human . . . → Read More: Conscious Experience and Science: Signs of Transition

Minding Emotions: The Embodied Nature of Emotional Self-Regulation

by Paul Moes

This article addresses concerns that the “nonreductive physicalism” (NRP) approach to understanding human nature may lead to a new form of determinism. The principal thesis of the article is that we can retain the idea of willful and responsible action even within the NRP perspective. Three additional positions are advanced: (1) Emotional processes are . . . → Read More: Minding Emotions: The Embodied Nature of Emotional Self-Regulation

 

July 2014
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Email Notification for Post