Information, Intelligence, and the Origins of Life

by Randy Isaac
The term “information” has a connotation of knowledge in the midst of ignorance, an order that arises amid disorder. Information exists everywhere around us, and we spend our lives acquiring, storing, transmitting, and processing it. Yet it is hard for us to define or describe it, in part because the word can be used . . . → Read More: Information, Intelligence, and the Origins of Life

The Evolutionary Origins of Genetic Information

by Stephen Freeland
Any living branch of science achieves progress by testing new ideas. The results of these tests determine whether each new idea is accepted as a change to what we thought we knew, is dismissed as incorrect, or simply stagnates, owing to a lack of clear evidence. For evolutionary theory, one such proposition is that . . . → Read More: The Evolutionary Origins of Genetic Information

Biological Information, Molecular Structure, and the Origins Debate

by Jonathan K. Watts
Biomolecules contain tremendous amounts of information; this information is “written” and “read” through their chemical structures and functions. A change in the information of a biomolecule is a change in the physical properties of that molecule—a change in the molecule itself. It is impossible to separate the information contained in biomolecules from their . . . → Read More: Biological Information, Molecular Structure, and the Origins Debate

Biblical Longevities: Empirical Data or Fabricated Numbers?

by Walter Makous

Whether the biblical longevities have biological or cultural significance depends on whether they represent actual longevities or are fabricated. As the properties of fabricated numbers differ from those of natural phenomena, this paper examines these properties, particularly in light of those differences. The results show (1) an exponential decline toward contemporary longevities, following approximate . . . → Read More: Biblical Longevities: Empirical Data or Fabricated Numbers?

Claiming Complementarity: Twentieth-Century Evangelical Applications of an Idea

by Christopher M. Rios

Over the course of the twentieth century the concept of complementarity earned considerable support among evangelical scientists. Leading figures in both the USA and Britain argued that science and theology offered distinct perspectives of the natural world that were reconcilable, if recognized as complementary descriptions rather than mutually exclusive claims. Though not without . . . → Read More: Claiming Complementarity: Twentieth-Century Evangelical Applications of an Idea

Sediment Transport and the Coconino Sandstone: A Reality Check on Flood Geology

by Timothy K. Helble

The origin of a graphical procedure developed by a prominent Flood geologist to estimate the water depth and current speed associated with deposition of cross-bedded sandstones during a global Flood is examined. It is shown how this graphical pro- cedure was used to estimate a widely quoted depth and speed of Flood waters . . . → Read More: Sediment Transport and the Coconino Sandstone: A Reality Check on Flood Geology

Design or the Multiverse?

by Ronald Larson

The effort to explain the “fine-tuning” of our universe by appealing to a “multiverse” of many universes from which our universe is selected for observation by our existence within it, is a double-edged sword. I argue that this line of “anthropic” reasoning implicitly depends on acknowledgment of “apparent design” in the universe, and in . . . → Read More: Design or the Multiverse?

Reading Scripture and Nature: Pentecostal Hermeneutics and Their Implications for the Contemporary Evangelical Theology and Science Conversation

by Amos Yong

This article recommends that more intentional focus on the theological character of the biblical message that involves the work of the Holy Spirit can be helpful in resisting the concordism, prevalent in some evangelical circles, that insists on harmonizing Scripture with science. Help in developing such an interpretive approach can be found, surprisingly, in . . . → Read More: Reading Scripture and Nature: Pentecostal Hermeneutics and Their Implications for the Contemporary Evangelical Theology and Science Conversation

Adam and Eve as Historical People, and Why It Matters

by C. John Collins

The best way to account for both the biblical presentation of human life and our own experience in the world is to suppose that Adam and Eve were real persons, and the forebears of all other human beings. The biblical presentation concerns not simply the story in Genesis and the biblical passages that refer . . . → Read More: Adam and Eve as Historical People, and Why It Matters

Genesis and the Genome: Genomics Evidence for Human-Ape Common Ancestry and Ancestral Hominid Population Sizes

by Dennis R. Venema 

The relatively new and rapidly expanding field of comparative genomics provides a wealth of data useful for testing the hypothesis that humans and other forms of life share common ancestry. Numerous independent lines of genomics evidence strongly support the hypothesis that our species shares a common ancestor with other primates. Additional lines of evidence . . . → Read More: Genesis and the Genome: Genomics Evidence for Human-Ape Common Ancestry and Ancestral Hominid Population Sizes

 

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